Even by the standards of recent tragedies experienced by my country, Mondays assassination of Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, was an anomaly.

My grandparents generation used to speak of the dread they felt for my parents during the so-called political violence of the 70 swhen Turkeys youth was nearly lost to armed fighting between the nationalists and the leftists on the streets and in college campuses. I have a friend whose parent was viciously gunned down by his political foes right in front of his young family.

The end result was the military takeover in 1980, which defined Turkish democracy back at least a decade.

The assassination on Turkish clay of a foreign dignitary like Ambassador Karlov is almost unheard of.

Political assassinations are sadly common in Turkey. In fact, Ottoman history is peppered with sons of sultans ordering assassinations against each other in order to take the throne.

Yet, the assassination on Turkish soil of a foreign dignitary like Ambassador Karlov is almost unheard of. Some have even likened Karlovs assassination to that of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, who was killed in Sarajevo in 1914 by a Serbian nationalist, triggering the outbreak of World War I.

This line of thinking might be a bit of a stretch, but there are other issues that attain the Russian ambassadors death still complicated and troubling for the future course of events in Turkey.

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Some have even likened Karlovs assassination to that of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria.