There is a new migration route to Europe that is safer and less expensivethan the ones through the Balkans or across the Mediterranean: the Arctic route.

Roughly 1, 200 migrants and refugeeshave made a one-way bike trip across the Russia-Norway border, escaping the barbed-wire fencings, strict border police and other adversities that others have faced on their way to European countries.

The International Organization for Migration estimates that 680,000refugees and migrants have stimulated their style to Europe by sea this year, and in agreement with the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, 3, 400 people have died or gone missing en route to Europe.

Photographer Alessandro Iovino of the Cesura collective followed the Syrian Alsaid family on their journey from Russia to Norway.

The Arctic route is used primarily by Syrians who first took refuge in Russia following political turbulence in 2011. Now, they are forced to flee for a second hour for different reasons, including dread of forced repatriation, pressure from the Russian mafia or simply in search of better economic circumstances.

Other refugees traveled to Russia years ago from countries like Jordan and Egypt, or just arrived in Russia on a tourist visa.

The journey to Europe often starts in cities like Moscow or St. Petersburg. From there, the refugees travel to Murmansk, which is located in the far north of the country and only 32 kilometers from the Barents Sea, near Russia's border with Norway.

Some refugees have enough funds for the expensive taxi ride from the Murmansk airport to Kirkenes in Norway. Others spend a couple of days in hotels like the Park Inn or Azimut in Murnmansk before they head by bus or taxi to Nickel, in Russia's Siberia, near the Norwegian perimeter.

There, they buy secondhand bicycles — which are able to cost between $150 and $200 — to attain the last stretch to Norway. Merely 50 meters separate the last Russian checkpoint and the European perimeter, but a law proscribes crossing them on foot.

Once they've reached Kirkenes, the refugees leave the bicycles by the side of the road. Thus ends a journey that costs approximately $2,000.

While the trip is less dangerous than the Mediterranean route, it is not without hazards.

Smugglers sometimes try to extort the refugees or keep them on Russian soil longer than necessary — often until immediately before their visas expire.

Follow the Alsaids on their style in Iovina's powerful photos:

Alessandro Iovino

A statue of Lenin. Moscow, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Sex shop. Moscow, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

The Red Square by night. Murmansk, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Overview of the city. Murmansk, Russia.

Alessandro Iovino

Snow-coated autoes. Murmansk, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Portrait of a son outside a military school. Murmansk, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Murmansk, Russia.

Alessandro Iovino

Buildings dating back to the Soviet regime. Murmansk, Russia.

Alessandro Iovino

Auto in snow in Murmansk, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

A migrant stands by Semenovskoe Lake in Murmansk, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

A human strolling home from run, at a factory in Nikel. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Nikel from above. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

The Hotel Polar Light in Nikel, where refugees remain. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

The Alsaid family at The Polar Light Hotel in Nikel. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Alsaid buys bread for his family in Nikel. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Preparations before deviation. Drivers and migrants load motorcycles and luggage into vans. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Alsaid's son in the street with fresh bread. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Alessandro Iovino/ collettivo Cesura

A taxi driver stands outside The Polar Light Hotel in Nikel. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Alessandro Iovino

A boy fixing a automobile at night. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

A refugee strolling down the road that leads to Kirkenes. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

A human walks among houses in the little border township. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Bikes strapped to one of the black market taxis. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Mansour disassembles his bike so he can load it into the car and take it to the Norwegian border. Everything takes place right outside the hotel: the taxi belongs to a black market taxi driver hired by the hotel manager. Nickel, Russia. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Alessandro Iovino/ collettivo Cesura

Refugees cross the Norwegian border, arriving by bike from the last Russian checkpoint. Kirkenes, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Alessandro Iovino/ collettivo Cesura

The entryway to the refugee camp in Vadso. A Syrian child rides a motorcycle beneath Norwegian flags. Vadso, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

A policeman on the Norwegian perimeter. Kirkenes, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

The Kirkenes countryside. Kirkenes, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

A group of elderly men sit at a bakery. People express anger about the enormous influx of refugees in the country. Vadso, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Portrait of two women in the refugee Fjellhallen gym, Which is now a refugee camp. Kirkenes, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Mansour analyse an abandoned barge. He says: “I've been traveling my whole life , nothing's new to me. It would be very difficult to surprise me.” Vadso, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Portrait of Alsaid's wife standing in the port at Kirkenes. Kirkenes, Norway. October 2015.

Alessandro Iovino

Portrait of Mansour in the refugee camp at Vadso. He feels like he's awaiting orders for His New future. Vadso, Norway. October 2015.